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The Role South Asian Attorneys Can Play in Shaping The Federal Judiciary

  • Tuesday, June 18, 2013
  • 6:30 PM
  • Thai Chili, 701 7th St NW, Washington DC, 20001
The Role South Asian Attorneys Can Play in Shaping The Federal Judiciary

From the time President Obama announced Sri Srinivasan’s nomination to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, to the day he was confirmed 97-0 by the Senate on May 23, the South Asian community rallied behind him.  We took an interest in the judiciary and in educating others about what this meant for South Asians to have the first South Asian on a federal court of appeals.   Our efforts paid off, and in the end, we have a judge, born in Chandigarh, India and raised in Lawrence, Kansas, sitting on what is considered the second most powerful court in the country.


Whether it is access to health care, racial and religious profiling or immigration laws – issues impacting South Asians are continuously before the federal courts. As South Asian attorneys, we have the opportunity, and the duty, to ensure our judiciary is fair, functioning and diverse.


Currently, 160 million Americans are living in a jurisdiction with a court room judicial vacancy.  Come learn about how South Asians can influence the federal judicial nominations process and help shape our judiciary.


About Sandhya Bathija: Sandhya Bathija is the campaign manager for Legal Progress, the legal policy and communications program at the Center for American Progress. Previously, Sandhya worked in the national communications department of the American Civil Liberties Union, where she led communications campaigns on the organization’s federal policy work, with a specific focus on immigrant rights, voting rights, racial justice, and criminal justice. Prior to working with the ACLU, Sandhya was part of the communications team at Americans United for Separation of Church and State, served as a reporter for The National Law Journal and practiced law for a civil rights firm in Detroit, where she represented clients in police misconduct cases. Sandhya holds a law degree from The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and a bachelor of arts in journalism and history from Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and Maxwell School of Public Citizenship.

SABA-DC 

Our goal is to address the needs and concerns of the South Asian American legal community in Washington, D.C. while providing our members with the knowledge and support necessary to reach their personal and professional goals.


You can find us here:

South Asian Bar Association of Washington, D.C.

P.O. Box 65349
Washington, D.C. 20035


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